2016 National Drinking Water Week Press Release

PRESS RELEASE
NATIONAL DRINKING WATER WEEK
MAY 2-6, 2016



Your Water!
To Know It Is To Love It.

This year marks the 42nd Anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the national legislation at the core of local and national efforts to provide safe drinking water and protect public health. This week, the American Samoa Environmental Protection Agency (AS-EPA) celebrates National Drinking Water Week (May 2 – 6, 2016) – a national observance that highlights the value of water in our daily lives.

National Drinking Water Week recognizes the importance of water source protection and conservation, as well as the value and fragility of our Territory’s water resources. Although water is available to us, we must all work together to ensure that it is safe for consumption. As part of its regulatory commitment to the community, AS-EPA works diligently with the American Samoa Power Authority (ASPA) to ensure that our local drinking water is potable (safe to drink) and meets all federal and territorial regulations. In addition to ASPA water, AS-EPA also monitors water quality from more than 90 water vending machines and 3 bottled water companies on island. These efforts are vital to the protection of public health as well as our local economy.

In American Samoa alone, more than 50,000 residents are served by over 100 public drinking water systems on a daily basis. These water systems range in size from a drinking water vending machine, to a larger public water system. Each resident relies on these water systems to provide a constant supply of potable water. However, consumers are often unaware of the challenges associated with producing safe drinking water. The tasks facing drinking water programs and public water systems continue to be extremely challenging – especially in an era of scarce resources and increased pollution.

In American Samoa alone, more than 50,000 residents are served by over 100 public drinking water systems on a daily basis. These water systems range in size from a drinking water vending machine, to a larger public water system. Each resident relies on these water systems to provide a constant supply of potable water. However, consumers are often unaware of the challenges associated with producing safe drinking water. The tasks facing drinking water programs and public water systems continue to be extremely challenging – especially in an era of scarce resources and increased pollution.